Resilience to Hazards

Project Status:

To meet the needs of fire and emergency managers in northern Australia, this project is establishing training units that meet the requirements of emergency management in the north.

Northern Australia bushfire and natural hazard training - project overview

Fire and emergency management in northern Australia is quantitatively and qualitatively different to that in the south of the continent. To meet the needs of fire and emergency managers in northern Australia, this project is establishing training units that meet the requirements of emergency management in the north. The factors differentiating between northern and southern training needs are significant, ranging from geographical (the scale of northern natural disasters and distances), to social and cultural, as in the impacts of natural disasters on remote Indigenous communities.

Nearly 360,000 of the people living in northern Australia live in communities with varying degrees of remoteness from ‘outer regional’ to ‘very remote’. These communities are predominately inhabited by Indigenous Australians, with the percentage rising in direct proportion to remoteness.

The project is providing a training program that builds on the current assets in the north such as the ranger programs and leads to increasing levels of competence and confidence and in its turn, resilience. The project is a response to north Australian stakeholder concerns that existing training is inadequate for their needs.

The core of this project is the development of new training materials; courses or packages that provide remote north Australian communities the skills and knowledge to manage landscape scale fire regimes as well as a range of other natural disasters. Pilot training courses will begin in late 2016.

13 October, 2016
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
White Toyota = Whiteboard”, Grace Daniels makes a point late in the late afternoon at the Limurlee workshop
22 September, 2016
Steve Sutton visited a place that's not on a map, and hard to pick out on Google Earth, for a workshop on resilience and emergency management in northern Australia.
Researchers and end-users in Darwin.
18 February, 2016
End-users and researchers met in Darwin this week to discuss the range of CRC research underway across northern Australia.
ARPNet researchers with Steve Sutton in Gunbalanya
6 January, 2016
The steady pulse of wet/dry hazard and threat seems remote to visitors to Indigenous communities in the Top End, but how do the locals feel about it? That is what we're trying to find out.
Yellow Water lilies
23 June, 2015
Can the way a community responds to a small natural hazard be a guide to the way it will respond to a more major event?
Workshop participants at Ngukurr.
5 June, 2015
CRC researchers have spent four days deep in Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory discussing the community resilience studies underway in the communities of Ngukurr and Gunbalanya.
Learning Together: Cross Cultural Emergency Management Training for Northern Australia
18 Aug 2015

This project develops BNH Training built on learnings from BNHCRC research and tailored to North Australian needs. It employs a didactic approach to build understanding of differing world views about fire and emergency management. Its delivery mode is designed to increase levels of competence, confidence and resilience, particularly in remote regions.

Research clusters

Explore by keyword