Understanding and Mitigating Hazards
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A new physics-based 3-D model will be a key part of this project’s strategy to develop “next generation” fire modelling capability and capacity.

Bushfires occur on a scale that may be measured in kilometres. However, a challenge faced in developing next generation bushfire models is to capture the significant contributions that small scale phenomena make to the spread of bushfires.

This project is using spatial averaging to accurately describe the interactions between the wind and vegetative canopies. Averaging methods are being used to quantify the rate of thermal radiation in bushfires.

These length scales will be spanned by making use of a computational technique known as large eddy simulation, which accurately resolves phenomena that occur on the length scales of tens of centimetres, and which relies on approximations of the small scale phenomena.

However, a conflict exists between modelling the physical details that govern the rate of spread of bushfires and the availability of computing power. As a result, one strand of the research is developing improved computational methods. One such method has enabled the project to model buoyancy-driven flows with great accuracy. The next stage of the project’s work is to apply it specifically to the rate of spread of bushfires.

Infrastructure must be not only bushfireresistant, but also aesthetically pleasing and economical to build. To be truly creative, designers benefit from having access to a deep understanding of the mechanisms that determine the rate of heat transfer between a bushfire and structures. A further strand of the research aims to develop simple-to-use formula that will help designers of infrastructure at the urban-bushfire interface.

The study will also obtain more accurate fuel data, develop a bushfire model based on Australian vegetation, model airflow through tree canopies, and provide a detailed description of the generation and spread of embers.

8 February, 2017
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
14 September, 2016
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Burning tree
10 December, 2014
This is the December 2014 newsletter from the Fire spread prediction across fuel types project, with updates for project end users.
25 August, 2014
Whilst in France during July 2014 I took the opportunity of meeting up with researchers in three laboratories.
Next generation models for predicting the behaviour of bushfires: Challenges and prospects
25 Aug 2014

Bushfires occur on a scale that may be measured in kilometers.  However, a challenge faced in developing next generation bushfire models is to capture the significant contributions that small scale phenomena make to the propagation of bushfires.   

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Flow Prediction Through Canopies
18 Aug 2015

A simple model of flow through a tree canopy and comparison with large-eddy simulations.

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Refinement and Validation of Firebrand Transport Sub Model for a Physics Based Bushfire Prediction Model: Design of  a Firebrand Generator
18 Aug 2015

Firebrands are burning pieces of, for example, bark, leaf litter, and twigs. Firebrands can be transported by wind from metres to kilometres from the head fire. Firebrands are responsible for causing spot fires during the spread of bushfire. Firebrands are the primary factor in house loss during bushfire.

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Duncan Sutherland Conference Poster 2016
14 Aug 2016

Operational fire models rely on wind reduction factors to relate the standard meteorological measured or forecast wind speed to the flame-height wind speeds within a tree canopy.

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